WOODBEST FEATUREDESIGN STYLECOLOR RANGESTAINABILITYDURABILITY
Australian CypressSometimes used as a substitute for heart/longleaf pineRustic, casualWide variation, golden tones; high knot contentTypically not stained; natural color6% harder than red oak
BambooConsidered a “green product”; is a grass, not a tree; plants regenerate quicklyContemporary or modern; often used where minimal grain or pattern is desiredLight cream or caramel colorAccepts stain wellSimilar to oak in hardness
BeechHigh crush strength, medium stiffness and resistance to shockBeech is used for curved parts of furniture and in Scandinavian type furnitureWhitish or very pale brown, darkening in time to light reddish brownDifficult as it does not absorb the stain evenly4% harder than red oak
Brazilian CherryExtremely durableTraditional to contemporaryDeep red/orange/brown tones; minimal knots; tight straight grainAccepts stain well; darkens with exposure to light; dominant red tones return82% harder than red oak
Domestic CherryBeautiful delicate grain with characterFormal/traditional for select grades; casual/rustic for character gradesGolden/honey tones; wide color variation common within a plankDifficult as it does not absorb the stain evenly26% softer than red oak
Hard Rock MapleDurable; minimal grain for a natural finish modern lookContemporary or modern; often used where minimal grain and no stain is desiredOff-white cream color to nearly white, on occasion has a reddish or golden hueDifficult as it does not absorb the stain evenly15% harder than red oak
HickoryPopular substitute for oak, walnut or mesquite; delicate grain with lots of characterCasual or rusticBeige/tan; wide color variation within a plankAccepts stain well; color stable41% harder than red oak
Knotty AlderSmooth hardwood with dark knots, lightens with ageChosen for its rustic, informal appearanceRanging from a light honey color to a reddish-brown hueNoticeable stain patina characteristics ranging in visibility from dark spots absorbing excessive stain to very light spots absorbing minimal stain45% softer than red oak
MapleMinimal grain; extremely tight color range in highest gradesContemporary, minimalist or modern; used where minimal grain or pattern is desiredCreamy white in highest grade; wide variation in lower gradesDifficult to stain evenly; ambers slightly with exposure to light12% harder than red oak
PineBeautiful character patina, grain pattern, tight growth rings, stableRustic, primative, Mission, casual, Old World, southwestern; pristine grades can be very formalNatural color is honey tonedDifficult to stain evenly; most attractive with a natural colorDurability is dependent on age; ranges from slightly softer than oak to similar hardness as oak
Red OakThe standard for basic cabinet material for yearsGrade and grain pattern can be manipulated to be formal or casualRed oak is slightly pinkAccepts stain very well; color possibilities are almost endlessOak is typically used as the benchmark for hardness
Soft MapleLower-priced than Hard Maple with a similar grain and figureContemporary, minimalist or modern; used where minimal grain or pattern is desiredLight to dark reddish brownDifficult to stain evenly; Paint Grade is color preferred25% softer than Hard Maple
WalnutRich deep color with delicate grain and lots of characterVery versatile; casual to formalNatural color is deep chocolate brownAccepts statin readily22% softer than red oak
White OakThe standard for basic cabinet material for yearsGrade and grain pattern can be manipulated to be formal or casualWhite oak is beige/tanAccepts stain very well; color possibilities are almost endless6% harder than red oak

Exclusively for Builders. By Builders.  ©2021 Barbosa Cabinets, Inc.  |  All Rights Reserved

Log in with your credentials

Forgot your details?